Classes

NEUR3615 Functional Neuroanatomy

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2019

This course aims to provide you with a basic understanding of how the vertebrate brain is organized. The course begins with an overview of the basic organization of the vertebrate brain, associated vasculature and the peripheral nervous system. The anatomy of several major brain regions will then be examined in further detail followed by the functional organization of the sensory systems. Although the focus will be on the anatomy of the mammalian brain, comparisons will also be drawn with other vertebrates in order to provide a deeper understanding of the anatomy of the brain.

NEUR 2990/3990/4990 Independent Studies

Offered: 

2018

We frequently have spaces for independent study students to work in the lab. Independent studies are a great way to get real, hands-on experience in the lab. We offer opportunities to learn dissection techniques, histology, immunohistochemistry, image analysis and access to the newest technology in digital slide scanning and microscopy. Individual research projects will be tailored according to the student's schedule, interests and active research being conducted in the lab.

NEUR4850 Comparative Neuroanatomy and Behaviour

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2018

This advanced course explores the link between the nervous system and natural behaviours across a wide range of species. Some of the examples to be covered include: bats, weakly electric fish, owls, songbirds, voles, locusts and moles. We will explore these non-traditional animal models and how they are used in neuroscience to better understand fundamental principles of brain function and the evolution of the brain. Students should have a background in neuroscience or animal behaviour.

NEUR 1000

Semester: 

Winter

Offered: 

2018

This is a new course that aims to provide a very general introduction to the nervous system, focusing on a series of narratives. Stories will include the discovery of the neuron, electric fish, the island of the colourblind and many more to provide some preliminary insight into the history of neuroscience and the basics of how the brain processes information from the world around us.

NEUR5025/7025 Seminar in Behavioural Neuroscience

Semester: 

Fall

Offered: 

2013

The aim of the graduate seminar course will be to discuss various issues related to being a scientist and developing skills necessary to become an independent researcher. The course involves written assignments, presentations and discussions. Topics include: time management, syllabus preparation, effective poster construction, scientific misconduct and fraud, jobs outside of academia, animal welfare and how to improve writing skills.